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Hereford1 Old Eign HillHampton Park HerefordHR1 1TUOpening HoursMonday to Friday 8.30am - 7pmSaturday 9am - 1pmfind us
Ledbury Branch39 New StreetLedburyHerefordshireHR8 2EAOpening HoursMonday to Friday 8.30am - 6pmSaturday 9am - 12.30pmfind us
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Surgery 

The practice performs routine procedures Monday to Friday, the majority of routine procedures happen in the morning. We ask owners bringing patients for planned procedures to arrive at the practice on the day between 8.30am and 9.00am, your pet will then be admitted and a vet or nurse go through the plan for the day. A pre-operative information sheet will be given to you when the procedure is booked.

What is Neutering?

Neutering is known as CASTRATION in male animals and SPEYING in female animals. In the male castration involves removing the testicles. In the female speying involves removing the ovaries.

Cats

Why should I neuter my cat?

  • From around 5-8months of age kittens are able to breed and produce kittens themselves. 

  • Infectious diseases such as Feline Immunodeficiency Virus and Feline Leukaemia Virus are spread through mating. Kittens born of an infected mother can also be infected.

  • Female cats will come into season and begin to 'call' about every 3 weeks. Having entire female cats in an area will attract entire male cats who may urine spray, fight and caterwaul. Female cats which are not neutered are more likely to suffer from pyometra (infection of the womb) and mammary tumours. 

  • Male Cats are likely to stray over large areas and become involved in fights with other cats. The risk of road traffic accidents and fighting injury is increased in entire male cats. Entire male cats are more likely to spray urine inside the house, this can be extremely pungent!

  • Neutered cats, on average, will live twice as long as entire cats. 

 

At what age should my cat be neutered?

We recommend neutering at 4 months of age. 

 

What does neutering my cat entail?

We will provide a pre-operative instruction sheet when you book your cat in for neutering. We will ask you to bring your cat into the practice between 8.30am and 9am on the day of surgery. Your cat will need to be left in our care for the day. Your cat will have a general anaesthetic monitored by a Veterinary Nurse whilst surgery is performed by a Veterinary Surgeon. Your pet will be monitored during recovery by a Veterinary Nurse and will have a heated bed with a fleecy blanket. We will ask you to contact the practice after 1pm when we will be able to give you a time to collect your cat. Your cat will be offered a small amount of food and water before going home, usually, around 4pm. A Veterinary Nurse will discharge your cat along with a 'going home sheet' containing any post operative information. 

We will ask to see your cat for an appointment 3 days post-operatively. During these 3 days your cat will need to be kept indoors.

If you have any further questions about neutering your cat please do not hesitate in contacting us. 

 

Dogs

Why should I neuter my dog?

  • Behaviour neutering may encourage calmer, more predictable behaviour making the dog a more suitable family pet.

  • May help reduce aggressive and unwanted sexual behaviour, preventing fighting, mounting and destructives. Dogs that are neutered are also less likely to mark territory or stray.

  • Reduces the likelihood of strange behaviour in bitches coming into season (for about three weeks, twice a year).

  • Prevents male dogs desperately attempting to escape and seek out a local bitch in season.

  • Removes the health risks associated with pregnancy as well as the possibility of potentially fatal womb infections (pyometra).

  • Avoids the mess and inconvenience of seasons.

  • Reduces or removes the risks of some cancers in both male and female dogs (including testicular and mammary cancers).

  • Money

  • Prevents the unnecessary costs of unplanned pregnancies and raising puppies.

  • Reduces likelihood of large vets’ bills associated with certain illness and accidents caused by unruly behaviour.

 

At what age should my dog be neutered?

Male dogs can be castrated from 6 months of age. However, if your dog is of a large or giant breed, prone to osteosarcomas - bone cancer, we may advise postponing neutering until 12 months of age. Breeds include Rottweilers, Irish Wolfhounds, Greyhound, Great Dane, Irish Setter, Samoyed and Dobermann. 

We recommend speying bitches 3 months after a season (ideally their 1st season). If you would rather your bitch was speyed before a season one of our vets will be happy to discuss this with you. 

 

What does neutering my dog entail?

We will provide a pre-operative instruction sheet when you book your dog in for neutering. We will ask you to bring your dog into the practice between 8.30am and 9am on the day of surgery. Your dog will need to be left in our care for the day. Your dog will have a pre-medication (sedation and pain-relief) followed by a general anaesthetic. The anaesthetic will be monitored by a Veterinary Nurse whilst surgery is performed by a Veterinary Surgeon. Your pet will me monitored during recovery by a Veterinary Nurse and will have a heated bed with a fleecy blanket. We will ask you to contact the practice after 1pm when we will be able to give you a time to collect your dog. Your dog will be offered a small amount of food and water before going home, usually, between 4pm and 6pm.

A Veterinary Nurse will discharge your dog along with a 'going home sheet' containing any post operative information. Male dogs will have a 'lamp shade' collar to go home with. Both dogs and bitches will have pain relief medication to be given at home for the next few days. 

We will ask to see your dog for an appointment 3 days post-operatively. At this check-up we will examine the surgical wound and advise on further pain relief, exercise/rest and any other monitoring required. During these first 3 days your dog will need strict rest, with lead walks only to go to the toilet.

At a 10 day post-operative check-up we will hopefully be able to 'sign your dog off' and allow life to continue normally again.

We also offer laparoscopic (keyhole) neutering for bitches. 

If you have any further questions about neutering your dog please do not hesitate in contacting us. 

 

Rabbits

Why should I neuter my rabbit?

  • Rabbits are happiest when kept in neutered pair or groups, they are very social animals.

  • Neutering prevents unwanted litters of kits (baby rabbits).Bear in mind that a female rabbit can become pregnant within minutes of giving birth and can have litters of up to 14 kits, that's up to 160 rabbits in just 1 year!

  • Even if you are keeping rabbits of the same sex together neutering is still recommended. Rabbits commonly become frustrated and even aggressive if left unneutered.

  • Speying female rabbits reduces the risk of cancer developing in the womb. 80% of rabbits aged 5-6 develop uterine cancer.

 

At what age can my rabbit be neutered?

We recommend castrating males from 4 months of age and females from 6 months of age, before any sexual behaviour or aggression is seen.

 

What does neutering my rabbit entail?

We will provide a pre-operative information sheet when you book your rabbit in for neutering. Your rabbit will be admitted as a day patient between 8.30am and 9am. We will ask you to bring some of your rabbits favourite food, so that we encourage your rabbit to eat after the operation. Your rabbit will be given intravenous fluids and medication before receiving a general anaesthetic. The anaesthetic will be monitored by a Veterinary Nurse whilst surgery is performed by a Veterinary Surgeon. Your pet will me monitored during recovery by a Veterinary Nurse and will have a heated bed. We will ask you to contact the practice after 1pm when we will be able to give you a time to collect your rabbit. Your rabbit will be encouraged to eat before going home, usually between 4pm and 6pm. 

A Veterinary Nurse will discharge your rabbit along with a 'going home sheet' containing any post operative information. We will ask you to ensure your rabbit is housed in a warm, draught free environment that evening. We will ask to see your rabbit for an appointment 3 days post-operatively.

If you have any further questions about neutering your rabbit please do not hesitate in contacting us.